Ledes from the Land of Enchantment

Albuquerque Police say ankle monitor violations are becoming a trend

According to court documents, an Albuquerque man is wanted for cutting off his ankle monitor last Friday. Ankle monitor violations are a problem the Albuquerque Police Department says is on the rise. “I want to say, you know, a couple weeks ago in a one-week period, there were seven,” said Gilbert Gallegos of the Albuquerque Police Department. According to APD data, between the end of March and the end of April, there were 15 incidents in which an individual violated ankle monitor terms. Violations mean the monitors are cut off or the batteries are drained on purpose. “We don’t want to be looking back saying, ‘I wish we could have kept this guy off the streets.’ Everything should be done to keep them in jail until their trial,” said Gallegos. The department thinks more needs to be done when it comes to monitor ankle legislation and technology given the recent trends. Democratic New Mexico State Rep. Marian Matthews sponsored House Bill 5 during the last legislative session. Part of the bill addressed ankle monitoring and some parts of the bill passed. “One of our real accomplishments was getting the funding to get 24/7 monitoring in every place where they’re using the GPS monitors,” Matthews said. But other important parts of the bill did not pass. “One of our focuses in the session was pretrial release of defendants charged with serious, violent felonies. And we were seeking to tighten that up so that the courts would be more careful with who was released,” Matthews added. Matthews said moving forward, she will support additional legislation regarding who is eligible to wear an ankle monitor. APD agrees that additional support is needed. “I don’t think you can stop everybody. You can’t legislate kind of what actions they’re going to take. So that’s why I think it’s important on the front end to determine who really should get ankle monitors,” said Gallegos. House Bill 5 was a piece of bipartisan legislation. The next opportunity for lawmakers to make a difference will be in the 60-day 2023 session.

According to court documents, an Albuquerque man is wanted for cutting off his ankle monitor last Friday.

Ankle monitor violations are a problem the Albuquerque Police Department says is on the rise.

“I want to say, you know, a couple weeks ago in a one-week period, there were seven,” said Gilbert Gallegos of the Albuquerque Police Department.

According to APD data, between the end of March and the end of April, there were 15 incidents in which an individual violated ankle monitor terms.

Violations mean the monitors are cut off or the batteries are drained on purpose.

“We don’t want to be looking back saying, ‘I wish we could have kept this guy off the streets.’ Everything should be done to keep them in jail until their trial,” said Gallegos.

The department thinks more needs to be done when it comes to monitor ankle legislation and technology given the recent trends.

Democratic New Mexico State Rep. Marian Matthews sponsored House Bill 5 during the last legislative session.

Part of the bill addressed ankle monitoring and some parts of the bill passed.

“One of our real accomplishments was getting the funding to get 24/7 monitoring in every place where they’re using the GPS monitors,” Matthews said.

But other important parts of the bill did not pass.

“One of our focuses in the session was pretrial release of defendants charged with serious, violent felonies. And we were seeking to tighten that up so that the courts would be more careful with who was released,” Matthews added.

Matthews said moving forward, she will support additional legislation regarding who is eligible to wear an ankle monitor.

APD agrees that additional support is needed.

“I don’t think you can stop everybody. You can’t legislate kind of what actions they’re going to take. So that’s why I think it’s important on the front end to determine who really should get ankle monitors,” said Gallegos.

House Bill 5 was a piece of bipartisan legislation. The next opportunity for lawmakers to make a difference will be in the 60-day 2023 session.

Comments are closed.