Ledes from the Land of Enchantment

“Erasing the Stigma”; Albuquerque Lowrider show more than what meets the eye

Known for their flashy paint jobs, hydraulic systems and unique culture low riders are not foreign to new Mexico. “It’s just that work of art rolling down the street, you know. There’s nothing like it out there,” Rob Vanderslice, a low-rider painter said. This weekend thousands came together at the Albuquerque Convention Center to enjoy the Lowrider Albuquerque Supershow. “A lot of the families are getting involved now with cruising with the lowriders. So that’s one thing that’s really beautiful about this,” Marcos Arellano, a lowrider owner from California said. Car clubs from all over came to Albuquerque to enjoy the show, but it wasn’t just the show that was important to everyone. “The big takeaway from this year’s convention was that we have a ways to go in terms of really building those bridges and eliminating the perception that stigmas that are around the lowrider community. We have folks here from National City, California, and they’re actually trying to get their ordinance repealed, the antique cruising ordinance,” Albuquerque City Councilor Klarissa Peña said. Part of the show was a conference that started Thursday. Back in 2018, Albuquerque’s no cruising ban was lifted, city councilor Klarissa Peña started that initiative and now she is trying to help other cities erase the stigma carried with low riding. “People think that low riding is attached to gang members. And that is something that I think came out of, you know, gangster rap and different things that happened in the nineties. But what we’re trying to do is prove that wrong by showing that it is an art form and is part of our culture and is beautiful,” Eryk Erazo, a member of the low riding community from Kansas said. Those who live in cities with a no cruise ban are happy with the support they are getting including those from Southern California. “We still need to work on it. But within this conference, we were inspired to know that, you know what, they did it. It took them a while, but we can do it too,” Jovita Arellano, a lowrider owner from California said. At the end of the day, those apart of the lowriding community say lending a hand is what it’s all about “I mean, that’s what the world is about, all of us helping each other. That’s the whole thing about it,” said Gilbert Ordelas, founder of Majesty Lowriders in El Paso. The show ended at 6 pm Sunday.

Known for their flashy paint jobs, hydraulic systems and unique culture low riders are not foreign to new Mexico.

“It’s just that work of art rolling down the street, you know. There’s nothing like it out there,” Rob Vanderslice, a low-rider painter said.

This weekend thousands came together at the Albuquerque Convention Center to enjoy the Lowrider Albuquerque Supershow.

“A lot of the families are getting involved now with cruising with the lowriders. So that’s one thing that’s really beautiful about this,” Marcos Arellano, a lowrider owner from California said.

Car clubs from all over came to Albuquerque to enjoy the show, but it wasn’t just the show that was important to everyone.

“The big takeaway from this year’s convention was that we have a ways to go in terms of really building those bridges and eliminating the perception that stigmas that are around the lowrider community. We have folks here from National City, California, and they’re actually trying to get their ordinance repealed, the antique cruising ordinance,” Albuquerque City Councilor Klarissa Peña said.

Part of the show was a conference that started Thursday.

Back in 2018, Albuquerque’s no cruising ban was lifted, city councilor Klarissa Peña started that initiative and now she is trying to help other cities erase the stigma carried with low riding.

“People think that low riding is attached to gang members. And that is something that I think came out of, you know, gangster rap and different things that happened in the nineties. But what we’re trying to do is prove that wrong by showing that it is an art form and is part of our culture and is beautiful,” Eryk Erazo, a member of the low riding community from Kansas said.

Those who live in cities with a no cruise ban are happy with the support they are getting including those from Southern California.

“We still need to work on it. But within this conference, we were inspired to know that, you know what, they did it. It took them a while, but we can do it too,” Jovita Arellano, a lowrider owner from California said.

At the end of the day, those apart of the lowriding community say lending a hand is what it’s all about

“I mean, that’s what the world is about, all of us helping each other. That’s the whole thing about it,” said Gilbert Ordelas, founder of Majesty Lowriders in El Paso.

The show ended at 6 pm Sunday.

Comments are closed.