Ledes from the Land of Enchantment

Albuquerque police, FBI pushing for more diversity in workforce

HNJO ONE OF THOSE AGENCIES ALBUQUERQUE POLICEUT O OF THE DEPARTMENT” 927 SWORN IN OFFICERS 27 OF THEM ARE BCKLA AND NONE OF THEM ARE WOMEN. SO APD IS LOOKING T COREATE SOME CHANGE EARLI TERODAY THE DEPARTMENT ALONG WITH THE FBI JOINED IN ON A SPECIAL RECRUITMENT FORUM HOSTED BYHE T LOCAL NCAA THEIR LEADERS SPOKE ON THE ISSUES AND MANY OFFICERS FACE WHEN WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES OF COLOR. THEYLS AO TALKED ABOUT STRATEG. SOME RENT TMHE FROM HAPPENING LIKE HIRGIN MORE PEOPLE WITH DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS. IT MAYE BA LITTLE MORE COMFORTABLE IF YOU LOOK FAMILIAR TO THEM IF THERE’S SOMEBODY YOU KNOW, YOU MAY LOOK LIKE THEIR UNCLE OR AUNT OR WHATEVER COULD BE WE WOULD LIKE THEM TO COME OUT ANDE B PART OF OUR DEPARTMENT IT HELPED RESTORE ALBUQUERQUE TO WTHA IT USED ​​TO BE AND WHAT IT CAN BE AINGA TO HELP WITH EFFORTS. THE DEPARTMENT IS OFFERING INCENTIVES, INCLUDING A $10,000 SIGNING BONUS FOR NEW OFFICERS. NOW AS I MENTIEDON BEFORE THE FBI IS ALSO LOOKING TO PROMOTE DIVERSITYN I ITS NUMBERS AND RANKS FIND OUT HOW THEIR EFFORTS ARE LOOKING COMING UP AT 6 REPORTING OUTSIDE APD HEADQUARTERS I

Albuquerque law enforcement agencies struggling to hire diverse officers

“If they can’t see that you can relate to the community or the person that you’re speaking with, there’s some barriers that exist. So we’re trying to break down those barriers,” Raul Bujanda, special agent in charge of New Mexico’s FBI division, said.

Updated: 6:43 PM MDT Mar 26, 2022

Law enforcement agencies in the Duke City are hiring, with a big focus on diversity and inclusion. On Saturday, the NAACP Albuquerque branch hosted a recruitment forum with leaders from the Albuquerque Police Department (APD) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The purpose of the event was to encourage more people of color to consider careers within the two agencies. “Communities of color, they don’t trust law enforcement. They have a tendency to be apprehension as far as working with law enforcement,” Dr. Harold Bailey, president of the local NAACP branch, said. For years, APD officials have been vocal about their need for police officers. The department was shy of its goal of 1,100 officers in 2021. “When people call for a police officer, we want to have a police officer come out quickly,” Rob Duren, an instructor at the Albuquerque Police Academy, said. “Right now, we just don’t have enough bodies to get out there quickly.”Leaders are even struggling to create equal representation within the workforce.According to the , of the 927 sworn APD officers, 27 are Black, and none of them are women.Raul Bujanda, special agent in charge for the state of New Mexico, said the FBI is also grappling with a lack of diverse teams.”Our numbers still don’t represent the population across the nation, so our push is to make those numbers represent the communities that we serve,” Bujanda said.Saturday’s event allowed residents to learn more about ways in which to join the agencies, including what their involvement could mean for local communities.”They may be a little more comfortable if you look familiar to them, or if there’s somebody you know,” Duren said. “You may look like their uncle, or aunt, or whatever it could be.” Bujanda said that could make all the difference when handling future situations. “What I tell my younger generations coming in, isn’t be more like them. Be more like you, because we need more like you,” Bujanda said. “We need more diversity. We need to hear your voice, because that’s what makes us stronger. That’s what makes us better.”APD is offering a hiring bonus of $10,000 for officers, and a starting wage of $32.69 an hour starting in July. For police service aides who are 18 and older, the department is providing a signing bonus of $1,500, and a starting wage of $15.43 an hour. The FBI is not offering incentives, but encourages people to visit their website here. The NAACP Albuquerque branch is planning to host similar recruiting events within the year.

Law enforcement agencies in the Duke City are hiring, with a big focus on diversity and inclusion.

On Saturday, the NAACP Albuquerque branch hosted a recruitment forum with leaders from the Albuquerque Police Department (APD) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The purpose of the event was to encourage more people of color to consider careers within the two agencies.

“Communities of color, they don’t trust law enforcement. They have a tendency to be apprehension as far as working with law enforcement,” Dr. Harold Bailey, president of the local NAACP branch, said.

For years, APD officials have been vocal about their need for police officers. The department was shy of its goal of 1,100 officers in 2021.

“When people call for a police officer, we want to have a police officer come out quickly,” Rob Duren, an instructor at the Albuquerque Police Academy, said. “Right now, we just don’t have enough bodies to get out there quickly.”

Leaders are even struggling to create equal representation within the workforce.

According to the , of the 927 sworn APD officers, 27 are Black, and none of them are women.

Raul Bujanda, special agent in charge for the state of New Mexico, said the FBI is also grappling with a lack of diverse teams.

“Our numbers still don’t represent the population across the nation, so our push is to make those numbers represent the communities that we serve,” Bujanda said.

Saturday’s event allowed residents to learn more about ways in which to join the agencies, including what their involvement could mean for local communities.

“They may be a little more comfortable if you look familiar to them, or if there’s somebody you know,” Duren said. “You may look like their uncle, or aunt, or whatever it could be.”

Bujanda said that could make all the difference when handling future situations.

“What I tell my younger generations coming in, isn’t be more like them. Be more like you, because we need more like you,” Bujanda said. “We need more diversity. We need to hear your voice, because that’s what makes us stronger. That’s what makes us better.”

APD is offering a hiring bonus of $10,000 for officers, and a starting wage of $32.69 an hour starting in July. For police service aides who are 18 and older, the department is providing a signing bonus of $1,500, and a starting wage of $15.43 an hour.

The FBI is not offering incentives, but encourages people to visit their website here.

The NAACP Albuquerque branch is planning to host similar recruiting events within the year.

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